Old Methods, Renewed Power

by Frank Jones


"The question was, how were the masses, respectable or disreputable, to be brought under the influence of the gospel. With regard to many of the recent answers to that question he had little sympathy and less faith. Evangelistic enterprise was just now in a mad mood and drunken with the wine of a rank sensationalism. It could not, however, last long. In his judgment, no new methods were needed, but new power resting on those they had: the sanctuary for those who would attend, with a consecrated man of God in the pulpit, who, out of a full heart, preached a full-orbed gospel, with trembling tenderness and unflinching faithfulness. Then, in addition, the hall, theatre, and mission room for those whose early prejudices kept them from the sanctuary. And then, beyond all, the house to house visitor. If they were to reached it must be by  going to them. As the result of his practical experience he advocated the multiplication of consecrated, soul-loving, trained missionaries. Of missions they had almost enough, of true missionaries not half enough. 'London for Christ' was a magnificent war-shout but ere it ever approxiimated a song of triumph, a fearful battle must be fought not only in noble churches, chaste chapels, and spacious tabernacles, but in miserable, little filthy dens, amid nakedness, vermin and vice. To lay hold of the masses they must grapple with their separate families, and grip them one by one. [1]" (Murray, Iain. Archibald Brown, Banner of Truth, 117)

[1] Of this necessity Brown said on another occasion" 'We do not reckon calling at doors anything; that is generally done by tract distributors all over London. We insist by hook or by crook in getting inside the house, and as far as possible leave no room unvisited. Door-to-door work only skims the surface. Our work must be room-to-room. Otherwise a large mass of misery and suffering would neever be brought to light.'