Not Without Honor Except at Home

by Frank Jones

J.C. Ryle had followed his sister’s conversion in 1837. He would return home a different man. He would recall according to his own pen.

”The consequences of this change were very great indeed ... it caused great uncomfortableness in my own family, and made my position very unpleasant indeed. In fact no one can tell what I had to go through, in hundreds of petty ways. ... It made an awkwardness, and uncomfortableness, and an insensible kind of estrangement which no one can comprehend but those who have gone through it. ... I had the constant uncomfortable feeling that on account of my religious opinions I was only a tolerated person in my own family and somewhat alienated and estranged from all my old friendships among my relatives.” (Murray, Ian. J.C. Ryle: Prepared to Stand Alone, 39.)

In this, Ryle would follow the steps of his Savior.  I have become estranged from my brothers and an alien to my mother’s sons. For zeal for Your house has consumed me, and the reproaches of those who reproach You have fallen on me. (Psa 69:8-9)