Maintaining a Close Walk

by Frank Jones


This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh.(Galatians 5:16)

We will once again seek the good council of Charles Simeon. Once Simeon was asked this question, "What is the way to maintain a close walk with God?" The importance of the answer is doubly impressed upon us as we walk with the Lord on His Day, the Lord's Day in His assemblies. Strive to keep maintain your mental thoughts and impressions absorbed in the beauty and glory of our Lord and Saviour.

By constantly meditating on the goodness of God and on our great deliverance from that punishment which our sins have deserved, we are brought to feel our vileness and utter unworthiness; and while we continue in this spirit of self-degradation, everything else will go on easily. We shall find ourselves advancing in our course; we shall feel the presence of God; we shall experience His love; we shall live in the enjoyment of His favour and in the hope of His glory. Meditation is the grand means of our growth in grace; without it, prayer itself is an empty service. You often feel that your prayers scarcely reach the ceiling; but oh, get into this humble spirit by considering how good the Lord is, and how evil you all are, and then prayer will mount on wings of faith to heaven. The sigh, the groan of a broken heart, will soon go through the ceiling up to heaven, aye, into the very bosom of God. (Moule, Charles Simeon, 149).

To Simeon, the work of the pulpit was inexpressibly important, and he could not politely conceal his sense of this. On another occasion, in Scotland, when 'God had been much with him as he preached', the minister of the church, just after the sermon, in the vestry, began to ask him about his travels. 'Speak to me of heaven, Sir,' he answered, 'and I can talk with you, but do not speak to me about earth at this moment, for I cannot talk about it.' He was quite shocked, he said, as he told the story at King's one Friday night: 'I cannot bear that matter-of-form spirit which makes the solemnities of God's house, and of worship, a mere business without a reality.' (Handley Moule, Charles Simeon, 76-77)