Sight of Christ in Scriptures

by Frank Jones


Whether God come to his children with a rod or a crown, if he come himself with it, it is well. Welcome, welcome Jesus, what may soever thou come, if we can get a sight of thee: and sure I am, it is better to be sick, providing Christ come to the bedside and draw the curtains, and say, Courage, I am thy salvation, than to enjoy health, being lusty and strong and never need to be visited by God.
— Samuel Rutherford, 1600-1661

The Master Behind Providence

by Frank Jones


It is impossible to be submissive and religiously patient, if ye stay your thoughts down among the confused rollings and wheels of second causes, as O, the place! O, the time! O, if this had been, this had not been followed! O, the linking of this accident with this time and place! Look up to the master motion and the first wheel.
— Samuel Rutherford, 1600-1661

Be Patient

by Frank Jones


Be patient; Christ went to heaven with many a wrong. His visage and countenance was all marred more than the sons of men. You may not be above your Master; many a black stroke received innocent Jesus, and he received no mends, but referred them all to the great court-day, when all things shall be righted.
— Samuel Rutherford, 1600-1661

If We have Christ

by Frank Jones


Neither need we fear crosses, or sigh, or be sad for anything that is on this side of heaven, if we have Christ.
— Samuel Rutherford, 1600-1661

Kindness for the Father's Upbringing

by Frank Jones


It is the Lord’s kindness that he will take the scum off us in the fire. Who knows how needful winnowing is to us, and what dross we must want ere we enter into the kingdom of God? So narrow is the entry to heaven, that our knots, our bunches and lumps of pride, and self-love, and idol-love, and world-love must be hammered off us, that we may throng in, stooping low, and creeping through that narrow and thorny entry.
— Samuel Rutherford, 1600-1661

Herein is Power

by Frank Jones


Herein is power;
When Deity and humanity were infinitely apart
he united them in indissoluble unity,
the uncreated and the created.
— (Valley of Vision, 28)

His Goodness, My Good

by Frank Jones


For He has satisfied the thirsty soul, and the hungry soul He has filled with what is good. (Psa 107:9)

To enjoy the goodness of God is a blessed life ....
— Allen Ross, "A Commentary on the Psalms," vol. 1, 753.

Devils Believe & Tremble

by Frank Jones


See to it that you not only assent to the truth, but that you receive the love of the truth: that you are not only persuaded [of the truth], but do embrace [it].
— Edwards, Jonathan. (Vol 25, page 515)

We Believe therefore We Speak

by Frank Jones


When people have affection for God, they talk about him; when they do not, they talk about themselves.
— Martin, Ryan. "Understanding Affections in the Theology of Jonathan Edwards," T&T Clark, 182-183.

Taste & See the Lord is Good

by Frank Jones


If the Lord-God raised our Lord Jesus Christ -imputed, the sins of the world; would the Lord-God fail to raise you -imputed, the righteousness of Christ? If God is for us, who can be against us?


Christ Matures Humility in His Children

by Frank Jones


“The gospel leads us to love Christ, as an humble person. Christ is one who is God-man, and so has not only condescension which is a divine perfection, but also humility which is a creature excellence. The gospel holds forth Christ to us as one meek and lowly of heart, as the most perfect and excellent instance of humility that ever was, and one in whom were the greatest testimonies and expressions of humility in his abasement of himself; for he humbled himself and became obedient unto death [Phil. 2:8]. Now the gospel leads us to love Christ as such an humble person, and therefore to love him with such a love as is proper to be exercised towards such an one, which is an humble love. And that the more, because the gospel leads us to love Christ not only as an humble person but a humble Savior, Lord and Head. If our Lord and Head be humble, and we love him as such, certainly it becomes us who are his disciples and servants to be so; for surely it does not become the servant to be prouder or less abased than his Master. Matt. 10:24–25, “The disciple is not above his master, nor the servant above his lord. It is enough for the disciple that he be as his master, and the servant as his lord.” John 13:13–16, “Ye call me Master and Lord: and ye say well; for so I am. If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you. Verily, verily, I say unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord; neither he that is sent greater than he that sent him.” Matt. 20:25–27, “Ye know that the princes of the Gentiles exercise dominion over them, and they that are great exercise authority upon them. But it shall not be so among you: but whosoever will be great among you, let him be your minister; and whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant.”” (Jonathan Edwards (WJE 8:247-248))


Divine Love & Humility

by Frank Jones


Seeing therefore it is so, that it is a sense of God’s loveliness which is the thing that works humility, hence we may learn that divine love implies humility. For love is the disposition of the heart, or it is respect towards God as lovely. If the knowledge of God as lovely causes humility, then a respect to God as lovely implies humility. And from this love to God arises a Christian love to men. And it therefore follows that a true love both to God and men implies humility.
— Jonathan Edwards (WJE 8:245)